Villanueva del Pardillo

Villanueva del Pardillo is a Spanish town and municipality located in the province and Community of Madrid, 27 kilometres from the capital.

Villanueva del Pardillo is located in the centre of the Community of Madrid, to the west of the capital of the Community and Madrid. It also lies within the basin of the middle course of the Guadarrama river, at an altitude of 650 masl.

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Villanueva del Pardillo was once a hamlet of Galapagar within the lands of the County of Real de Manzanares and the Duchy of the Infantado. It was then part of an estate. In the church hierarchy, it used to belong to the Archpriesthood of Canales and the Archbishopric of Toledo. It was established before the Black Death swept Europe in the middle 14th century, as documented in Alfonso XI’s Libro de la montería.

El Pardillo was not far from Galapagar, to which it was subordinated for administrative and tax purposes.

Villanueva del Pardillo was granted a town charter on 4 November 1702. Until then, it had been known as El Pardillo and lacked town privileges. Under Philip V, settlements were allowed to purchase town charters, which is exactly what the inhabitants of El Pardillo decided to do.

As a result, the Queen Regent, Maria Anna of Neuburg, acting on behalf of Philip V, granted a town charter to the settlement hitherto known as El Pardillo, which changed its name to Villanueva del Pardillo. It was included in the Colmenar Viejo judicial district following administrative reforms in the 19th century.

All memories of the town’s history between the late 18th century and 1939 were lost when the church and Town Hall were destroyed along with their archives during the Spanish Civil War. Villanueva del Pardillo found itself on the front line of the Battle of Brunete, after which a single house was left standing. Known as La Casona (Big House), it is now home to a cultural centre and the town library.

Later regeneration plans and real estate growth in and around Madrid have fuelled the rapid expansion of the town, which picked up pace in the 21st century.

Los Palacios archaeological site dates from the Roman era and was listed in the Archaeological Charter of the Community of Madrid, drafted in the years after the promulgation of Law 16/1985 on the Spanish Historical Heritage.

Recent infrastructure works (Canal de Isabel II) provided an opportunity to conduct a partial dig at the site in 2013. This presentation aims to showcase the value and importance of the archaeological remains found here.

A Roman villa was built near Los Palacios brook in the 1st century and remained in use until the late 4th century. A Roman villa is a construction design developed in rural areas as a farming operation. As well as serving as its owner’s residence, the compound included a series of buildings where the various products harvested from the environment were transformed.

The productive part of the villa was known as parafructuaria and spans the buildings uncovered during the archaeological dig. There was a torcularium (winery) fully equipped with a calcatorium (treading vat and storage room), a press room, a lacus (receiver for grape juice) and the counterweight needed for the whole system to work.

The torcularium in Villanueva del Pardillo was the first and, so far, the only complete building of this type documented in the Community of Madrid.

Los Palacios archaeological site dates from the Roman era and was listed in the Archaeological Charter of the Community of Madrid, drafted in the years after the promulgation of Law 16/1985 on the Spanish Historical Heritage.

Recent infrastructure works (Canal de Isabel II) provided an opportunity to conduct a partial dig at the site in 2013. This presentation aims to showcase the value and importance of the archaeological remains found here.

A Roman villa was built near Los Palacios brook in the 1st century and remained in use until the late 4th century. A Roman villa is a construction design developed in rural areas as a farming operation. As well as serving as its owner’s residence, the compound included a series of buildings where the various products harvested from the environment were transformed.

The productive part of the villa was known as parafructuaria and spans the buildings uncovered during the archaeological dig. There was a torcularium (winery) fully equipped with a calcatorium (treading vat and storage room), a press room, a lacus (receiver for grape juice) and the counterweight needed for the whole system to work.

The torcularium in Villanueva del Pardillo was the first and, so far, the only complete building of this type documented in the Community of Madrid.

Our town is nestled in a unique natural environment located within the area of the Guadarrama Middle Course Regional Park, in a place known as Dehesa Boyal.

The forests that make up the landscape are an invaluable natural resource and are especially protected within the area of the Guadarrama Middle Course Regional Park.

Our meadows are home to a wide range of indigenous plants and animals, including a sprawling ash grove of great environmental value. It also hosts the Virgen del Soto Shrine, where a traditional romería (pilgrimage) takes place every year on the third Sunday of May.

The pilgrimage route through the Guadarrama Regional Park is criss-crossed by signed paths. There are also several facilities in the area.

  • Tables
  • Waste containers
  • Playgrounds
  • Car park (one at the start of the path and another)
  • near the recreational area
  • A fitness circuit

Taking into account the special access conditions, the area is equipped with two large containers located at the entrance to the recreational area. During peak periods, visitors are required to deposit rubbish bags in the containers and, if the containers are already full, to bring the rubbish to the collection points set up in the streets near the access path so that we can all protect our natural environment together.

The Guadarrama Middle Course Regional Park and its environment is a highly diverse natural area that extends from the foothills of the mountains near Madrid to the rural landscapes in the Tagus depression, following the course of the Guadarrama and Aulencia rivers.

The feasts in honour of the patron saint of the town are held in mid-October (Saint Luke, 18 October) and start with the traditional opening speech, followed by musical performances, activities for children and young people, popular dances, bullfighting, sports activities and more.

The third Sunday of May is the feast of the Virgen del Soto, the patroness of Villanueva del Pardillo. In keeping with tradition, the image of Our Lady is taken out in a procession to a place known as Fuente del Manchego, where the town chapel is located. Religious ceremonies are punctuated by popular dances, musical performances, traditional games and more.

  • Devastated region area. Town centre and pedestrian zone.
  • La Casona. The only building left standing after the Civil War (now a cultural centre)
  • Water tank
  • The meadows and Virgen del Soto chapel